EVENT: Film Weekend


Film_Weekend_(events page)

Friday 21 – Sunday 23 September 2018

Messums Wiltshire is proud to present our FILM WEEKEND, a festival complementing our IMAGE exhibition by celebrating photography’s counterpart: the moving image.

A broad collection of narrative and documentary films will be screened with introductory talks and Q&A sessions with cinematographer Tristan Oliver (Loving Vincent), longterm collaborator of Nick Parks and with the director and writer of Becoming Cary Grant, Mark Kidel.

The films will be held in our specially constructed ‘cinema room’ at the southern end of the tithe barn. Shrouded in black theatrical curtain, this area has been built into the layout of our photography exhibition.

Tickets for each film are priced at £10, with 12s and under being £5.

Please refer to age ratings at the bottom of each individual listing. Parental discretion is advised with films labelled PG or 12A.

Loving Vincent (2017)
Friday 21 September, 6pm

duration 1hr 35 mins

“We cannot speak other than by our paintings.” Vincent van Gogh, the week before his death.

Join Loving Vincent’s (and Isle of the Dogs) cinematographer Tristan Oliver for an introduction to a screening of the film, followed by an audience Q&A.

Loving Vincent is an experimental animated biographical drama film about the life of painter Vincent van Gogh and, in particular, the circumstances of surrounding his death. It is the first fully painted animated feature.

Each of the film’s 65,000 frames is an oil painting on canvas, using the same techniques as van Gogh and created by a team of 125 artists. Once a frame was completed the painting animator would take a 6k resolution digital still and then start work on the next frame.

All the characters in Loving Vincent are performed by real actors either on specially constructed sets, designed to look like Vincent’s paintings, or against Green Screens. The live-action material was then combined with computer animation for elements such as birds, clouds and blowing leaves.

The film won Best Animated Feature Film Award at the 30th European Film Awards in Berlin and was nominated for Best Animated Feature at the 90th Academy Awards.

Tristan Oliver has been a cinematographer for over 20 years and worked across various disciplines. His long-term collaboration with director Nick Park includes Academy award winners, ‘Wrong Trousers’, ‘A Close Shave’ and ‘Curse of the Were-Rabbit’. His work with other directors has produced BAFTA short winners, ‘Stage Fright’ and ‘The Big Story’ as well as the popular feature films ‘Chicken Run’ and the Academy award nominated, ‘The Fantastic Mr Fox’, ‘ParaNorman’ & ‘Loving Vincent’.  Tristan has also been the principal photographer on ‘Isle of Dogs’, Wes Anderson’s second animated feature film and showing here on Saturday afternoon.

Age Certificate: 12A

On Yoga: The Architecture of Peace (2017)
Saturday 22 September, 11am
duration: 1hr 27 mins

This is director Heitor Dhalia’s first documentary, following photographer Michael O’Neill as he talks to the great Yoga masters of India, Tibet and New York.

Whether bathing with holy men in the Ganges or joining the chorus of a thousand voices chanting ‘om’, O’Neill decided to devote himself to experience and record the world of yoga at this critical juncture in its history. The result is a powerful cinematic and photographic tribute to the age-old discipline turned global phenomenon, with over 250 million practitioners united in physical, spiritual, and mindful practice worldwide.

Famous for his photographs of the rich and famous (from Andy Warhol to Richard Nixon), O’Neill set out to make portraits of the most influential spiritual masters of our time – B. K. S. Iyengar, Shri K. Pattabhi Jois, T. K. V. Desikachar, Rodney Yee, Colleen Saidman, Gurmukh Kaur Khalsa.

On Yoga: The Architecture of Peace was the winner of ABC’s 2018 Documentary Best Cinematography Award. In 2015 Michael O’Neill in tandem with Taschen published a book of the same name.

Age Certificate: PG

Isle of the Dogs (2018)
Saturday 22 September, 2pm

duration 1hr 45 mins

“Wes Anderson’s joyous stop-motion feature looks and sounds like nothing we’ve encountered before.” Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal

In this stop-motion animation film from writer/director Wes Anderson, an outbreak of canine flu in a dystopian near-future Japan leads all dogs to be quarantined on an island. A boy journey there to rescue his dog Spots and gets help from a pack of misfit canines who have also be exiled. His quest inspired a group of dog lovers to expose a government conspiracy. The voice cast includes Bill Murray, Scarlett Johansson, Tilda Swinton and Yoko Ono.

The stop-motion movie consists of 130,000 still photographs. Each frame was created, with diligence, by a team of 670, many of who worked with Anderson on Fantastic Mr Fox. Isle of the Dogs has received praise for its animation, story and deadpan humour. A manga adaption of the film by Minetaro Mochizuki was published in 2018.

Wes Anderson won the Berlin International Film Festival’s Silver Bear for Best Director and the film won the SXSW Film Festival Audience Awards for Headliners.

Age Certificate: PG

Blow Up (1966)
Saturday 22 September, 5pm

duration 1hr 51mins

“[Blow Up] was the highest-grossing art film to date, was picked as the best film of 1967 by the National Society of Film Critics, and got Oscar nominations for screenplay and direction. Today, you rarely hear it mentioned.” Robert Ebert, 1998

Italian director Michelangelo Antonioni’s first English-language production was also his only box office hit, widely considered one of the seminal films of the 1960s. Thomas (David Hemmings) is a nihilistic, wealthy fashion photographer in mod ‘Swinging London’. Filled with ennui, bored with his ‘fab’ but oddly-lifeless existence of casual sex and drug use, Thomas comes alive when he wanders through a park, stops to take pictures of a couple embracing, and, upon developing the images, believes that he has photographed a murder.

The film also stars Sarah Miles (a photograph of whom by Norman Parkinson is featured in our IMAGE exhibition), John Castle and Jane Birkin, as well as the 1960s supermodel Veruschka. The film was produced by Carlo Ponti, who had contracted Antonioni to make three English-language films for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (the others were Zabriskie Point and The Passenger). It won the Grand Prix du Festival International du Film at the Cannes Film Festival in 1967 and Antonioni won Nastro d’Argento’s Best Foreign Director.

Age Certificate: 15

Fear Eats the Soul (1974)
Sunday 23 September, 11am

duration 1hr 35mins

“One of the most beautiful films ever made, plain and simple.” Tom Huddleston, Time Out

Regarded as one of the high-water marks in German New Wave cinema of the 1970s, Feat Eats the Soul is at once an intense portrayal of a relationship and a tribute to one of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s film heroes, Douglas Sirk.

Esteemed director Fassbinder not only directed the film, but also scripted it, designed the sets and produced.

Emmi, a German woman in her mid-sixties, falls in love with Ali, a Moroccan immigrant worker around twenty-five years younger. When they abruptly decide to marry, everyone around them seems appalled. When the folks calm down a bit, Emmi and Ali’s relationship grows even more uncertain.

The film won the International Federation of Film Critics award for best-in competition movie and the Prize of Ecumenical Jury at the 1974 Cannes Film Festival. It is considered to be one of Fassbinder’s most powerful works and is hailed by many as a masterpiece.

Age Certificate: 12A

Becoming Cary Grant (2017)
Sunday 23 September, 3pm

duration 1hr 25mins

Join the director and writer Mark Kidel for an introduction to the screening of Becoming Cary Grant, followed by an audience Q&A, in what will prove to be the spectacular finale of our film weekend.

For most of his life, Cary Grant, one of Hollywood’s greatest stars, was troubled with self-doubt and insecurity – the result of childhood trauma. In his fifties, reaching mid-life, he took a long course of LSD therapy, hoping to exorcize his demons.

Using words from his unpublished autobiography and newly discovered and evocative footage shot by Grant, we explore the star’s journey from childhood to poverty to global fame, and from darkness to light. We discover, for the first time, a different Cary Grant, the man behind the mask of subtle charm and suave sophistication that he wore to hide his insecurities. This is the moving story of a man in search of himself, on a quest to find the love that eluded him for most of his life.

‘For the first time one of Hollywood’s greatest starts tells his own story, in his own words. Cary Grant, the ultimate self-made star, explores his own screen image and what it took to create it’.

Age Certificate: PG

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1 Comment
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    Beautifully made doc. #BecomingCaryGrant by Mark Kidel. So wonderful to be allowed to absorb a good film makers work. As docs used to be and should be. Horrified that Mark is having to work abroad because of the clamp down on imagination and space here for creative people. I gave up film making years ago because of that. Now a Jungian Analyst. Free to roam in a different way.

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