STUDIO VISIT: Bridget McCrum


Bridget's studio

Saturday 6 May 2017,  Booking
Join us for a studio visit to artist Bridget McCrum ahead of her solo exhibition for Messums Wiltshire this summer.As well as a highly regarded sculptor, Bridget has always considered the landscape and setting to be a relevant and enjoyable part of the creative process of sculpting. Her garden is one of the real pleasures for any one interested not just in works of art, but also landscape and context in the garden. Set above the river Dart her garden is full of works from her earliest years to latest pieces, with a consideration given to space and how to place them.

Transport to Dittisham is available by separate arrangement.

Meeting time: 11:00am

Lunch: 12:30am

Bridget McCrum was born in 1934 and lives and works in Devon and Gozo in Malta. She studied at Farnham College of Art, training as a painter with Lesjek Musjynski, in the 1950s. She came to sculpture in her forties and from 1980 began to work primarily in stone, having learned her craft from John Joeku and Andrea Schulewitz on the South Downs. She has exhibited extensively and recent selected solo exhibitions include One Canada Square, Canary Wharf, 2014 Messum’s, London, 2011 Messum’s, London, 2008, Messum’s, London, 2002, St James Cavalier Art Centre, Malta. Her work is included in many international collections including: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Rolls Royce Aero Engines, Bristol, Lismore Castle, Co Cork, HSBC, Malta, Spencer Stuart, London, and the Golden Door Foundation, San Diego. Her work is held in private collections in the USA, Canada, the Middle and Far East, Europe and the UK.

Working primarily in stone, she also works directly in plaster and translates both of these materials into bronze.  McCrum’s work is distinguished by her preferred subject matter: the juxtaposition of fauna, notably birds, with ancient artefacts such as tools and ceremonial weapons.  She perceives a synergy between nature and the tools of early industry found on archaeological sites, drawing parallels between these primitive objects and the curve of a wing, or a texture found on very old stones. These inform her work and are present in her large-scale pieces.

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