MAKERS WEEKEND: Demonstration – A Sculptor at Work


 

DSC_0004_7

Saturday 29 & Sunday 30 April 2017
Talk at 11:00am each day followed by a demonstration, open to all

We are delighted to have local sculptors from Coade Ltd with us for the Makers Weekend.  There will be a talk open to all at 11:00am each day followed by a demonstration of how they work that will continue throughout the day.

At COADE the team of highly skilled craftsmen recreate classical sculpture, contemporary pieces and private commissions in Coade stone. Created from stoneware using a secret recipe and then fired at a very high heat, Coade stone makes it possible to produce sculpture with the finest detail that is also incredibly durable and has the appearance of stone.

First developed in the 18th Century by Eleanor Coade, a highly successful businesswoman of her time, she was employed by every eminent architect of her day. Her work can be found in all parts of the British Isles and has been exported around the world. Because Coade stone is remarkably resistant to the harshest weather, most of her pieces are in as good condition now as when they were first made over two hundred years ago.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

STUDIO VISIT: Bridget McCrum


Bridget's studio

Saturday 6 May 2017,  Booking
Join us for a studio visit to artist Bridget McCrum ahead of her solo exhibition for Messums Wiltshire this summer.As well as a highly regarded sculptor, Bridget has always considered the landscape and setting to be a relevant and enjoyable part of the creative process of sculpting. Her garden is one of the real pleasures for any one interested not just in works of art, but also landscape and context in the garden. Set above the river Dart her garden is full of works from her earliest years to latest pieces, with a consideration given to space and how to place them.

Transport to Dittisham is available by separate arrangement.

Meeting time: 11:00am

Lunch: 12:30am

Bridget McCrum was born in 1934 and lives and works in Devon and Gozo in Malta. She studied at Farnham College of Art, training as a painter with Lesjek Musjynski, in the 1950s. She came to sculpture in her forties and from 1980 began to work primarily in stone, having learned her craft from John Joeku and Andrea Schulewitz on the South Downs. She has exhibited extensively and recent selected solo exhibitions include One Canada Square, Canary Wharf, 2014 Messum’s, London, 2011 Messum’s, London, 2008, Messum’s, London, 2002, St James Cavalier Art Centre, Malta. Her work is included in many international collections including: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Rolls Royce Aero Engines, Bristol, Lismore Castle, Co Cork, HSBC, Malta, Spencer Stuart, London, and the Golden Door Foundation, San Diego. Her work is held in private collections in the USA, Canada, the Middle and Far East, Europe and the UK.

Working primarily in stone, she also works directly in plaster and translates both of these materials into bronze.  McCrum’s work is distinguished by her preferred subject matter: the juxtaposition of fauna, notably birds, with ancient artefacts such as tools and ceremonial weapons.  She perceives a synergy between nature and the tools of early industry found on archaeological sites, drawing parallels between these primitive objects and the curve of a wing, or a texture found on very old stones. These inform her work and are present in her large-scale pieces.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

STUDIO VISIT: CONTOURS – Tim Harrisson’s Studio & Walk to the Barn


Tim_Harrisson_Studio (events thumbnail)
Saturday 22 April, 11am 
Bookings
Join us on Earth Day for a studio visit to local celebrated artist Tim Harrison, followed by a guided country walk through the bucolic local landscape back to Messums Wiltshire for a light lunch.

Timings:
Depart Messums Wiltshire 10:15 (transport provided)
Walk back to Messums Wiltshire, approx 45 minutes.
Please note that the walk is optional and open to all who have suitable shoes for cross country walking and relevant experience, own risk etc.

Tim Harrisson was born in Essex in 1952 and lives and works in Hindon, Wiltshire, He studied at Hammersmith College of Art, Norwich Art School and Byam Shaw School of Fine Art. In 1988 he was Sculptor in Residence at Red House Museum, Christchurch, organized by the Hampshire sculpture Trust. He has exhibited widely in both group and solo exhibitions, including the Drawing Centre Marlborough, 2011, Bournemouth University, Atrium Gallery and Creswell Crags Museum. He shows work regularly at the New Art Centre, Roche Court, near Salisbury. Recent commissions include, West Park House, Southampton City Centre, the Russell Coates Museum Bournemouth, and Chatsworth House, Derbyshire. In 2013 a selection of his works on paper were acquired by the British Museum, and in 2014 Creswell Heritage Trust in collaboration with the Art Fund and the V&A Museum purchased a series of six drawings. He was elected to the Royal West of England Academy in 2013 and 2015 and was a member of the selection panel for the RWA’s biennial open exhibition, Drawn.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

BEHIND THE WHEEL: Clover Lee from The Great Pottery Throw Down


Clover_Lee

Saturday 29 April 2017, 12:30pm  Booking
We are delighted to welcome the BBC’s GREAT POTTERY THROW DOWN finalist and part time illustrator Clover Lee to a unique 50 minute session on our wheel as part of the Makers Festival. Join, watch, learn and ask questions as Great Britain’s leading potter Clover Lee take you through the experiences and steps for creating beautiful vessels on the wheel.
Clover Lee was born in a small town in southern China – and moved to Wales in 2003, to study accountancy.
The 33-year-old moved to London after graduating, and her interest was pricked when Clover attended an evening class at Clapham Pottery in 2011.
Clover is proud of her Asian heritage and creates a mixture of functional and stunning items – such as bonsai planters, decorative vases, sake sets, mugs and tableware.
She says she is “inspired by the traditional art and culture of China and Japan”.
As well as pottery, Clover is a self-taught illustrator.
She has been practising manga drawing, an Asian-style comic similar to anime, from the age of 12.
Clover also regularly attends comic conventions around the UK.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

ART IN MOTION: Les Colombes (ballet)


mara new programme image

FINAL PERFORMANCE, Sunday 4 June, 4 – 8pm  Bookings

Messums Wiltshire and The Covent Garden Dance Company are delighted to present an intimate series of creative rehearsals on Friday the 2nd and Saturday the 3rd of June which lead up to a final working performance on Sunday 4 June at 6pm. “Les Colombes” is a completely new work based on the last libretto written by the late Terence Brady.

An All Session ticket entitles you to attend any of the five creative sessions as well as the final Sunday performances at 6pm.

Creative sessions are ticketed and are on: Friday 1-4pm and 6-9pm. Saturday. 12-3pm and 6-9pm. Sunday evening 4pm – 8pm.

The creation of the new work by Covent Garden Dance’s Resident Choreographer for 2017-18 Tim Podesta will be on Royal Ballet Guest Principal Mara Galeazzi and Royal Ballet Principal Ryoichi Hirano and Clare Morehen who is a Principal with the Queensland Ballet.

These sessions are a unique insight into the creative process that goes into each work performed for our company or for any company.

Tickets are limited to 150 places.

 

Co-Production between Messums Wiltshire, Covent Garden Dance Co and M&T In Motion

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

SMALL WORKS & CONCEPTS – Artists talk with Laurence Edwards


Laurence_Edwards_Studio

GENUS:  Small Works & Concepts from the Studio
Friday 12 May – Sunday 4 June 2017
ARTISTS TALK:  Saturday 13 May 2017, 11:00am  Booking

Another title to describe this collection of works might have been simply ‘Maquettes’. In many ways some of them are. Smaller works designed to illustrate the capability and potential of the larger scale, but it all sounds rather lifeless, and as a word, it takes us away from the point of these works in Laurence Edwards’ creative process.

They are evolutions and explorations often to their own end around a central theme. A host of ideas springing from the same point of origin, related but evolving. A Genus of ideas urgently pushing like nature for existence by evolution. There is no sense in Laurence’s work that one has succeeded better than the other, no search for a superior, just manifestations of the way that ideas, like nature, constantly evolve…whether we want them to or not.

Laurence_Edwards_Studio rack Lo resLaurence’s work aims directly at the connection we have to the earth, as representations of our own identity, which they unquestionably are. They remind us of our clay origins, and that life is both burden and celebration.

One of the few sculptors who casts his own work, Laurence Edwards is fascinated by human anatomy and the metamorphosis of form and matter that governs the lost-wax process. The driving force behind his work is bronze, an alloy that physically and metaphorically illustrates entropy, the natural tendency of any system in time to tend towards disorder and chaos. His sculptures express the raw liquid power of bronze, its versatility, mass and evolution, and the variety of process marks he retains tell the story of how and why each work came to be.

Christopher Le Brun PRA praised Edwards specifically for his ability to blur the boundaries between man and nature. And organic forms continue to literally influence his work, be it Suffolk grasses mixed into the process clay, or cast into elements that transform his figures into something allegorical or mythic.

Based in Suffolk, he trained at Canterbury College of Art and then at the Royal College of Art, where he studied bronze casting and sculpture with Sir Antony Caro. After winning a Henry Moore Bursary, the Angeloni Prize for Bronze Casting and an Intach Travelling Scholarship, he studied traditional casting techniques in India and Nepal, an experience that not only influenced his treatment of form and technique, but also gave him the necessary tools to establish his own atelier.

Save

Save

Save

Save

CONTEMPORARY CERAMICS, Is It Craft Is It Art, Does It Matter? – Talk with Paul Greenhalgh


Contemporary Ceramics

Sunday 30th, 2:00pm – 3:00pm
£10 in advance, £15 on the door Booking
Leading Academic and thinking Professor Paul Greenhalgh leads us through some of the past and present thinking and what this might tell us about the future.
Professor Paul Greenhalgh is director of the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, a position he has held since 2010. He was educated at Smithills Grammar School in Bolton, the University of Reading and the Courtauld Institute of Art in London. From 2006 to 2010 he was director and president of the Corcoran Gallery of Art and Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, D.C. He has also been Head of Research, and Deputy Keeper of Ceramic at the Victoria and Albert Museum.
His published work to date includes:
Ephemeral Vistas: The Expositions Universelles, Great Exhibitions and World’s Fairs, 1851–1939. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1988.
Essential Art Nouveau. London: V & A Publications, 2000.
Art Nouveau: 1890-1914, edited by Paul Greenhalgh. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art, 2000.
The Modern Ideal: The Rise and Collapse of Idealism in the Visual Arts from the Enlightenment to Postmodernism. London: V & A Publications, 2005.
The Persistence of Craft: The Applied Arts Now, and Art Nouveau 1890–1914.
He is currently working on a forthcoming publication on ceramics due out this Autumn.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

ARTISTS TALK – with Judy Pfaff


Judy_Pfaff (events thumbnail)

Wednesday 29 March 2017, 6 – 8pm
Free Event Booking

Judy Pfaff is bringing her debut exhibition to Messums Wiltshire in the Autumn. Join us for an introductory talk from this highly respected UK born American artist.

Judy Pfaff is a pioneer of installation art in the 1970s and creates exuberant, sprawling sculptures and installations that weave landscape, architecture and colour drawing on many modern traditions, Futurism, Constructivism, Cubism, Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism. Born in the UK she works in New York she responds to the environment in which she is working – in the case of Messums Wiltshire a 13th Century architecture in which she will use a variety of 21st century materials including plastics, fibreglass and steel to make a sixty foot long sculpture.

Judy is a professor of art at Bard College and has mounted more than 100 solo exhibitions and her work appears in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.  She has held numerous visiting faculty appointments at such institutions as the California Institute of Arts, Yale University, the Rhode Island School of Design, Oberlin College, and Princeton University. Pfaff was a member of the graduate faculty at the School of Visual Arts, New York (1986–1991), and was a professor of visual arts at Columbia University (1992–1994).

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

ENDURING LEGACY OF POT – Talk with Julian Stair


Enduring Legacy of the Pot

Sunday 30 April, 11 – 12pm
£10 in advance, £15 on the door Booking
With multiple publications to his name, including co author with Christie Brown on “Contemporary Clay, Museum Culture” (Routledge 2016) Julian Stair’s is a formidable knowledge on the history, symbolism and narrative of clay’s iconic form.
We are delighted to welcome Julian to Messums Wiltshire as exhibitor and lecturer. This talk is a must for both those with in depth knowledge as well as those who are coming to the subject for the first time.
The talk will run for approx 45 minutes with a question and answer session to follow.

About Julian Stair:
Born 1955 in Bristol Julian is an English potter, academic and writer. He makes groups of work using a variety of materials, from fine glazed porcelain to coarse engineering brick clays. His work ranges in scale from hand-sized cups and teapots to monumental jars at over 6 feet tall and weighing half a ton.
Stair has exhibited internationally over the last 30 years and has work in over twenty public collections including the Victoria & Albert Museum, British Council, American Museum of Art & Design, Hong Kong Museum of Art and the Boymans Museum, Netherlands. In 2004 he was awarded the European Achievement Award by the World Crafts Council for the project Extended Inhumation and received a Queen Elizabeth Scholarship to research the making of monumental ceramics at Wienerberger’s brick factory in Sedgley. In 2008 the Art Fund purchased Monumental Jar V for Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art.
His most recent project was the solo exhibition Quietus: The Vessel, Death and the Human Body which was commissioned by mima and supported by Arts Council England. The exhibition addresses the containment of the human body in death and features a series of funerary works, from cinerary jars to life-size sarcophagi, so of which are on show as part of the exhibition at Messums Wiltshire.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

THE PLEASURE OF MAKING: SYMBOLISM TO RITUAL – Talk with Christie Brown


 

Christie Brown_The Uncanny Playroom, 2010_Photo Credit Sussie Ahlberg 2 (ceramics show page)

Saturday 29 April, 4 – 5pm
£10 in advance, £15 on the door Booking
Leading contemporary artist in clay Christie Brown and Curator Catherine Milner discuss the mythology and symbolism of clay and the making process.

Christie Brown is an artist and Emerita Professor of Ceramics at the University of Westminster in London. She was Principal Investigator on the AHRC project Ceramics in the Expanded Field, awarded to the University’s Ceramics Research Centre in 2011, which included her solo exhibition DreamWork at the Freud Museum in London in 2013.
She has exhibited her ceramic sculpture widely in the UK and abroad and frequently lectured about her practice at international residencies and conferences.

Catherine Milner has worked in the international art world for more than twenty years. Formerly Arts Correspondent of the Sunday Telegraph newspaper, she now regularly contributes articles about art to a number of publications including the Financial Times, the Economist and Apollo Magazine.
Having studied Fine Art at Edinburgh University her first job was working for the Barbican Art Gallery. She has since specialised in contemporary British art and was one of the first to write about the Young British Artist group in the early 1990s. Since then she has focused on contemporary Middle Eastern art and traveled extensively throughout the region. She has also recently started taking small groups of collectors to artists studios, exhibitions, art biennales and art fairs around the world.

Save

Save

Save

Save

1 2 3