Words From The Woods – An Evening of Poetry, Recitals & Music with Pippa Haywood, James Fleet and Theo May


Andy Goldsworthy - Wood Line

Friday 25 August, 6pm

£10 in advance £15 on the door  Booking

An evening of poetry, recitals, film and music arranged by Pippa Haywood with recitals by James Fleet, and music by Theo May.

Taking the exhibition Material: Wood – Design & Inspiration as it’s starting point, the evening will draw together strands from the fields of poetry, song and literature bound to each other by our relationship to Wood the material and to Woods the place. The event will include both live and recorded readings with film, and is interspersed with original compositions by violinist Theo May.

James Fleet is a well known and much loved British actor who has had a world renowned career in theatre and film, including “Four Weddings and a Funeral” and “The Vicar of Dibley”. As well as a roles in recent British comedy on television, he has a love of barns, wood, bikes and the spoken word.

Theo May is a brilliant young talent studying at the Royal College of Music. Those who witnessed his performance in  “Birdsong” in March will identify with our anticipation ahead of this event.

Pippa’s wide ranging TV and radio work has made her a familiar voice to many. She is a regular reader for Poetry Please on Radio 4 and has appeared in numerous TV comedies and dramas. Pippa lives locally to Tisbury and has been a vocal supporter of our Barn and its programme of exhibitions, events and performances. This is the second event we have hosted in collaboration and furthers and interest we both hold in seeing how place and poetry complement each other.

 

Image:  Andy Goldsworthy ‘Wood Line’

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TALK: Furniture Maker John Makepeace ‘Beyond Parnham – An Enduring Legacy’


John_Makepeace_Dorset_Fruits

Wednesday 16 August 2017, 6:30pm. Bookings

John Makepeace, one the country’s most influential makers talks about the evolving traditions in making.

John Makepeace’s career has been an adventure in wood. He first saw fine furniture being made when he was eleven, and then he visited the great cabinet makers in Copenhagen as a teenager. Design and craftsmanship came naturally to him.

Early professional recognition led to his work as a design consultant to the all India Handicraft Board, a founding member of the Crafts Council in the UK and a Trustee of the V&A, London. Early commissions from Templeton and Keble College, Oxford, Liberty’s and the Banque Générale du Luxembourg, were followed by major museums, corporate and private collections around the world.

Keenly aware of the need for an integrated education for furniture designers and makers going into business, he bought Parnham House, Dorset in 1976 to set up a college alongside, but separately from, his own furniture studios. Parnham College rapidly gained an international reputation; 2017 marks 40 years since the launch with the book Beyond Parnham, the story of an educational phenomenon as 100 Alumni reflect on their careers.

The clearance of forests to fuel the Industrial Revolution and the consequent dependence on imported timber prompted the purchase of Hooke Park, the 350 acre woodland nearby. The subsequent European programme of collaborative research explored the improved utilisation of indigenous timber and resulted in a series of award-winning buildings for the new campus. Following the move of the College to Hooke Park, it amalgamated with the Architectural Association, the international school of architecture.

John Makepeace was awarded an OBE in 1988 for services to furniture design, received Lifetime Achievement Awards from both the American Furniture Society (2004) and the Furniture Makers Company (2010). He is an Honorary Fellow of the Arts University Bournemouth (2009) and of Hereford College of Arts (2013). In November 2016 he won the Prince Philip Designers Prize .

‘John Makepeace: Enriching the Language of Furniture’ was the subject of an Arts Council Touring Exhibition between September 2010 and November 2011.

John’s work was featured in two Victoria & Albert Museum exhibitions in 2012: ‘The Power of Making’ and ‘British Design 1948-2012 – Innovation in the Modern Age’.

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GALLERY TALK: with Charlie Noton, Arborist & Founder of Tree Research


Charlie Noton

Sunday 27 August, 11:30am  Bookings

Charlie Noton is the founder and lead consultant of Tree Research Limited. Originally trained as an arborist, he has been working in the arboricultural industry for over twenty years – managing, maintaining and creating historic gardens and parklands in the UK.

Charlie NotonCharlie’s love of trees and interest in their environmental impact inspired him to establish Tree Research in 2004, as a means of protecting tree populations and enhancing our appreciation and understanding of them.

His aesthetic inspiration derives from the gardens and parklands of Capability Brown, in which he grew up. His planting schemes reflect this by blending formal gardens and topiaries seamlessly into parkland and the surrounding countryside.

Charlie Noton is the founder and lead consultant of Tree Research Limited. Originally trained as an arborist, he has been working in the arboricultural industry for over twenty years – managing, maintaining and creating historic gardens and parklands in the UK.

Charlie’s love of trees and interest in their environmental impact inspired him to establish Tree Research in 2004, as a means of protecting tree populations and enhancing our appreciation and understanding of them. A naturalist at heart, Charlie has an intuitive sense of what trees need, and can source, supply, plant and care for trees in a variety of environments.

His aesthetic inspiration derives from the gardens and parklands of Capability Brown, in which he grew up. His planting schemes reflect this by blending formal gardens and topiaries seamlessly into parkland and the surrounding countryside.

TALK: with Furniture Artist Fred Baier


FRED_BAIER _CUBE_IN_A_CUBE_.photo_Mark_Somerville_©_2012 (events page) (10)

 

Saturday 26 August, 4:00pm  Bookings

Join us at the barn on Saturday 26 August for an informal and anecdotal talk with furniture artist Fred Baier, one of the great characters of twentieth century design.  Fred will discuss various projects including being artist in residence at the House of Lords. His work is contemporary, modern and innovative and in his quest to find new form it has spanned the analogue digital divide. “My work is a way of life not just something I do for a living. I’m an explorer more than a designer.”

Since attending the Royal College of Art, furniture artist Fred Baier has gained fellowships to the Royal Society of Arts, Royal College of Art and Northern Arts as well as being consultant to the Design Council, Crafts Council, Regional Arts Associations, Architects, Interior Designers, Manufacturers, Educational Institutions and Private Clients.

Photo © Mark Somerville

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TALK: with Gavin Munro, The Man Who Grows Chairs


Steve Jackson With Prototype 1 c Neil Hanna

Monday 28 August, 11:00am  Bookings

Taking a radical stance on the way we produce our objects, Gavin Munro and his company Full Grown are at the cutting edge of an emerging art form that highlights an interesting way to be closer to art and nature and the symbiotic relationship between them both.

2016-09-07--7.21 pm---IMG_0527 copyUsing ancient techniques combined with modern technology they grow, graft, nurture then harvest living trees into chairs, tables, sculpture – anything you can imagine.

Challenging the way we create products as well as how we see the items with which we surround ourselves, grown furniture has an immediate tactile, visceral and organic appeal.

Join us for a fascinating hour of conversation to hear how the first seed was sown as a young boy playing in the garden, a concept that took 25 years to take root.  His work is now feted by leading collectors and designers alike with a waiting list for his work.

TALK: Lyme Regis Boat Building Academy


Peapod (web)

Thursday 24 August, 6:30pm  Bookings

Boat Building Academy Instructor Matthew Law understands career changing – he ran large-scale humanitarian assistance programmes for NGO’s and the U.N. in East Africa (accompanying Audrey Hepburn on her last tour for Unicef) and lectured at Trinity College, Dublin before, 18 years ago, saying ‘Goodbye to All That’ and becoming a boat builder.  He is now an Instructor at the Boat Building Academy, a hothouse for aspiring boat builders in Lyme Regis.

Founded 20 years ago to provide intensive training for career changers, the Academy’s students now also include post ‘A’ Level students, retirees and everything in between.  Gap year, lifetime ambition, sabbatical or career, students age 18 to 82 (so far) live and work together building boats.  People looking for a career normally walk off the beach and straight into work at a boatyard, or cabinet maker, or classic car restorer, or museum or F1 car builder, to list a few.

In the inspirational setting of Messums Wiltshire on 24 August Matthew will talk about the creative and practical choices available to boat builders and the impact of technology on a traditional craft; the merit of epoxy v copper nails, lofting v CAD files, CNC v saw.  His talk is illustrated by boats that students have built as part of their training, some of which started from little more than a blurred, ancient photo posted on the internet.

TALK: Sandy Brown discusses her installation ‘Temple’


Sandy_Brown_The_Temple (events page)

Saturday 2 September, 11:00am  Bookings

Join ceramic artist Sandy Brown discussing her unique installation ‘Temple’ here at the gallery.  The piece was commissioned by Sotheby’s to create an exciting large scale installation for their Beyond Limits exhibition at Chatsworth House and is now here with us at the barn.

Sandy was inspired by her visits to Venice, the Taj Mahal, the Blue Mosque in Isfahan, also by Chagall and Matisse.

The Temple stands over 6 metres tall and includes over 5,200 handmade decorated ceramic tiles. It took 11 months to complete and is a major work, with an air of exuberance, colour and vitality. The inside is a riot of colour set off by eight bright fused glass windows by Simon Moore.

‘As its name suggests, Temple looks at first more like a building than a sculpture.

 But a closer look makes us realise just how much Temple challenges all our notions of a house of prayer.  It is perhaps more of a sacred space or sanctuary’

Brown’s range of reference is extraordinarily wide, and its richness matches the adventurous way in which she brings about an unorthodox marriage between architecture, sculpture, painting, tile decoration and much else besides.  The outcome is an exhuberant gesamtkunstwerk – a bringing together of different art forms in a new composite.  It flouts all of our expectations.

At once anarchic, unpredictable, playful, unruly, seductive and enlightening, Brown’s tour de force is inexhaustible.  As an artist she demonstrates her bold sense of adventure, embracing the world of line, form and colour to create a haven for visitors.’

Richard Cork