SMALL WORKS & CONCEPTS – Exhibition of Sculptor Laurence Edwards


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GENUS:  Small Works & Concepts from the Studio
Friday 12 May – Sunday 4 June 2017

Another title to describe this collection of works might have been simply ‘Maquettes’. In many ways some of them are. Smaller works designed to illustrate the capability and potential of the larger scale, but it all sounds rather lifeless, and as a word, it takes us away from the point of these works in Laurence Edwards’ creative process.

They are evolutions and explorations often to their own end around a central theme. A host of ideas springing from the same point of origin, related but evolving. A Genus of ideas urgently pushing like nature for existence by evolution. There is no sense in Laurence’s work that one has succeeded better than the other, no search for a superior, just manifestations of the way that ideas, like nature, constantly evolve…whether we want them to or not.

Laurence_Edwards_Studio rack Lo resLaurence’s work aims directly at the connection we have to the earth, as representations of our own identity, which they unquestionably are. They remind us of our clay origins, and that life is both burden and celebration.

One of the few sculptors who casts his own work, Laurence Edwards is fascinated by human anatomy and the metamorphosis of form and matter that governs the lost-wax process. The driving force behind his work is bronze, an alloy that physically and metaphorically illustrates entropy, the natural tendency of any system in time to tend towards disorder and chaos. His sculptures express the raw liquid power of bronze, its versatility, mass and evolution, and the variety of process marks he retains tell the story of how and why each work came to be.

Christopher Le Brun PRA praised Edwards specifically for his ability to blur the boundaries between man and nature. And organic forms continue to literally influence his work, be it Suffolk grasses mixed into the process clay, or cast into elements that transform his figures into something allegorical or mythic.

Based in Suffolk, he trained at Canterbury College of Art and then at the Royal College of Art, where he studied bronze casting and sculpture with Sir Antony Caro. After winning a Henry Moore Bursary, the Angeloni Prize for Bronze Casting and an Intach Travelling Scholarship, he studied traditional casting techniques in India and Nepal, an experience that not only influenced his treatment of form and technique, but also gave him the necessary tools to establish his own atelier.

 

Details of works on show

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Art in Motion: Sculpting Masterclass with Mark Coreth


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ART IN MOTION: Spirit of the Horse

Sculpting Masterclass with Mark Coreth

Saturday 17 June  Bookings

Distinguished international sculptor Mark Coreth leads a sculpting master class for all ages on 17 June. Join a group of 8 experienced sculptors on an all day course, or book one of 15 places for young makers age 8+ years, for a session of up to two hours, creating your own horse to take home.  (Please note: children must be accompanied by an adult).

Mark_Coreth image (Events thumbnail)Mark Coreth is internationally recognized as the master sculptor of the animal in motion, he has an acute and perceptive eye drawing heavily on experiences gained during his early years in Kenya.

Working quickly in clay or plasticine, Mark captures speed, movement and the sheer physicality of his subjects. Mark shows regularly in London, Paris and New York and his most famous pieces include a 16 foot high life size charging elephant which was the subject of a Discovery Channel documentary; a life size sculpture of the legendary racehorse Frankel, commissioned by the owner Prince Khalid Abdullah and unveiled by the Queen at Ascot in 2015.

Mark-Coreth-Portrait-of-Frankel-2

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Art in Motion: : “Looking at Horses” A Trainer, A Painter and A Sculptor


Emma_Sergeant_Lipsko, Summer(M469) (web) - Events thumbnail

ART IN MOTION:  Spirit of the Horse

‘Looking at Horses’ – An Evening in Conversation with a Trainer, a Painter & a Sculptor

Wednesday 14 June, 6:30 – 8:30pm Free to attend  Booking

Enjoy a unique evening in the company of Hughie Morrison one of this Country’s great trainers, renowned painter Emma Sargeant and a sculptor, as we discover with the aide of questions both from the audience and from Fonthill Stud owner Alastair Margadale what their expertise can bring to how we look and understand one of humanity’s greatest partnerships.

Hughie Morrison1-hughie-morrison

Hughie Morrison has had success spanning over nearly 2 decades. His commitment and passion for his horses being the driving force behind this huge success which has been nothing short of phenomenal.

Winners like Pastoral Pursuits (July Cup G1 at Newmarket 2005), Alcazar (Prix Royal Oak G1 at Longchamp 2005, the eldest horse in Europe to win a G1) and Sakhee’s Secret (July cup G1 at Newmarket 2007), have firmly placed Hughie on any would be owner’s short list to train their horse.

 

Emma SergeantEmma_Sergeant Photo Credit Kiloran Howard

Emma Sergeant is one of England’s best known figurative painters. Amongst her foremost admirers is His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales, who wrote: “one of the most admirable qualities of Emma’s art is the strength of her drawing, a hard-earned skill which she has fine-tuned over years of experiment and practice.” He also praised her as a wonderful traveling artist, a judgement based on the time she spent accompanying him on of his official tours of Egypt, Morocco and the Central Asian Republics in 1995 and 1996.

At the age of 21 Sergeant won the National Portrait Gallery Award and was then commissioned by the museum to paint a portrait of the most famous British actor of his generation, Lord Lawrence Olivier. Subsequently Sergeant has received numerous important portrait commissions throughout her career, her subjects including HRH The Prince of Wales and HRH The Duke of York, both of whom own a number of her works.

Sergeant has a deeply serious and professional artistic purpose, which is well reflected in all of her works. Her rich, mixed-media compositions highlight the subtleties of man’s intrinsic bond with animals, particularly dogs, horses and dolphins.

Over the years, Sergeant has exhibited with a number of leading art organizations, including Agnew’s, The Fine Art Society and the Prince’s Foundation, in London; the Mona Bismarck Foundation in Paris; and the Newhouse Gallery, New York.

Photo credit:  Kiloran Howard

 

Charlie LangtonCharlie_Langton

I’ve always had a love of horses and I was drawn to them as a subject from an early age. Over time this has developed into a deep fascination with their anatomy and character. Capturing the physicality as well as the character of horses in a way that isn’t formulaic and bland but at the same time conformationally correct is the challenge. Injecting the bronze with the feeling of energy and life that exudes from every thoroughbred horse in abundance is the driving force in my work and one that I’m devoted to mastering.

They are natures greatest athletes, in my opinion, and when you combine that physical power and ability with a willingness and determination to try, and consider they are nothing short of aesthetically awe inspiring, you have a thoroughly intriguing subject. Attempting to capture this combination is a fascinating challenge, which changes with every horse.

I’ve adopted two of my mothers thoroughbreds who serve as willing models.

I was 6 when I lucky enough to have a grey Welsh mountain pony, called Whizz. He lived up to his name and I have very fond memories of time spent with but mainly being thrown off Whizz.

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